Book Reviews

Review by Gail Leggio

Cecilia Beaux: A Modern Painter in the Gilded Age by Alice A. Carter. New York: Rizzoli, 2005. 224 pages, illustratedThe subtitle of Alice A. Carter’s new book suggests a familiar paradox, the Edwardian society painter with enough formal edge to command respect today, and the artist who immediately comes to mind is John Singer Sargent (... More »

Review by Gail Leggio

Discovering Caravaggio: The Art Lover’s Guide to Understanding Symbols in His Paintings by Stefano Zuffi. New York: Rizzoli, 2010. Illustrated in color, 255 pp.            The year 2010 marked the 400th anniversary of the death of Michelangelo Merisi, known as Caravaggio (1571–... More »

Review by Gail Leggio

Colors Passages through Art, Asia and Nature by Sarah Sutro. North Adams, Massachusetts: Blue Asia Press, 2010. 129 pp. This is a very personal little book, essentially a memoir describing how the author learned the dyer’s craft while living inBangladesh. But Sarah Sutro, a painter and poet who has been a fellow at the... More »

Review by Gail Leggio

Robert Vickrey: The Magic of Realism by Philip Eliasoph. Manchester and New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2008. Illustrated, 228 pages.American Arts Quarterly, Spring 2009, Volume 26, Number 2.Robert Vickrey is a crucial figure in the mid-twentieth-century renaissance of egg tempera, a demanding technique he has been exploring over six... More »

Review by Alison Armstrong

Why Art Cannot Be Taught, by James Elkins. Urbana & Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2001.  213pp. Paperback. ISBN: 0252069501There is a specter haunting higher arts education today, and its name is rationalism. There are goblins, too: theory-driven art, lack of clarity in terminology and intention, hidden agendas in... More »

Review by Stephen May

The Invention of Painting in America by David Rosand. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004. 210 pages. ISBN: 0231132972Exactly 150 years ago, Hudson RiverSchoolstalwart Asher B. Durand, writing in his important but short-lived art journal, The Crayon, pondered the dilemma confronting American artists: “[T]he most important thing,”... More »

Review by Stephen May

Charles Willson Peale: Art and Selfhood in the Early Republic by David C. Ward. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004. 236 pages. ISBN: 0520239601Painter, patriot, naturalist, educator, inventor, museum-keeper and self-styled arbiter of cultural tastes, Charles Willson Peale (1741–1827) is surely one of the most remarkable... More »

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